Monday, 5 March 2018

Pelargonium longicaule - species pelargonium

P. longicaule
A friend in South Africa kindly sent me some seed of Pelargonium longicaule that grows in her garden.  She had seen my reference on one of the Facebook pages to P. trifidum that I grow in a hanging pot and said that P. longicaule also grows well in a hanging pot.  You can see my 2010 blog about P. trifidum here

The seeds arrived with me in about June or July last year and I sowed them immediately.  Only one germinated and this was quickly grown on and is now a fairly large and sprawling plant.   I was delighted to spot a flower on my plant this morning.

Diana Miller, in her book Pelargoniums, says that the first reference to this plant is in 1767 when it was described as a form of P.myrrhifolium but there has been much confusion about the nomenclature of this section.  Found growing in mountainous regions of south-western Cape Province, P. longicaule is a low growing and spreading plant with white to pale pink flowers, often tinged yellow in bud.

I am looking forward to growing this in a hanging pot this year.

Friday, 2 March 2018

"Charmay Snowflurry" - Scented Leaf Pelargonium and some views of RHS Garden, Wisley

With the entire UK grasped in the grips of both “The Beast from the East (Siberia) and Storm Emma (from Iberia), the scented leaf pelargoniums are a delightful reminder of summer to come.   “Charmay Snowflurry”, despite its name, does remind me of summer - the lavender flowers sit well against the pale green and white blotched leaves, which have a lemon-rose scent.       “Charmay Snowflurry” was raised by Ken Attfield, Australia.

Leaves of Charmay Snowflurry

I have made several visits to RHS Garden, Wisley recently.  Here are some of the photographs I took

The following two pictures are part of the lights display that RHS Wisley put on before Christmas.  They were just setting it up when I was there.

More photo's of my visits to RHS Garden, Wisley can be seen on my other blog - Camera Capers

Sunday, 18 February 2018

Zonartic Pelargonium "Lara Genie" and butterflies down under

"Lara Genie" - zonartic pelargonium

Another beauty from the late Cliff Blackman - softest pale pink double flowers.

I visited a butterfly farm on my trip to Australia last October.  Here are some of the butterflies I saw and managed to photograph.

You can see more photographs of my trip to Australia in October on my Blog "Camera Capers".

Tuesday, 6 February 2018

Dwarf Pelargonium "Grainger's Aralia" and a new Pelargonium website

"Grainger's Aralia"

This is one of my favourite zonal pelargoniums.  Not often seen, Grainger's Aralia has soft peach coloured semi-double flowers.  The leaves are gold with a brown zone.   Raised in Canada by Will Grainger and named for his daughter.

I received an email the other day from Donn Reiners inviting me to take a look at his new website -   Do take a look, it is the most comprehensive site on pelargoniums I have come across.  All aspects of growing our favourite plants are covered, from potting soils, taking cuttings, growing from seed to shaping for the best effect.    As usual, Donn's photographs in the Photo Library are just beautiful, and there are lots of them, from species to my favourite zonals.  Do take a look: -

Saturday, 27 January 2018

Miniature zonal pelargonium "Telstar" and the Iris at Morning Star Nursery

"Telstar" miniature zonal pelargonium

I got this miniature zonal "Telstar" when I visited Sulman's Nursery when they closed down many years ago.  It is quite a favourite of mine. The flowers are double and a deep rose pink with mid green foliage.  This was introduced by the Revd. Stringer in the UK in 1972.

On my visit to Australia last October my sister had arranged a visit to Morning Star Nursery.  This is .primarily an Iris nursery, but they also grow pelargoniums.  Sadly the owner, Anne Hazel, had lost her partner earlier in the year and the pelargonium part of the nursery was rather run down. Anne was determined, though, to build up the pelargoniums again.   There were many gems amongst the pelargoniums, and I wished I could have stayed and helped Anne to sort out the plants.  

The iris field was just beginning to come into its full glory and we all spent a very pleasant hour wandering around the field admiring the blooms and taking photographs. 

I look forward to visiting again on my next visit to Adelaide.   However, I think I will take Wellington boots to wear.  We had wondered why Anne was wearing wellington boots on such a hot day.  After we had left, she let it be known that she always wore her boots when walking around the nursery because snakes often sheltered amongst the iris plants.